Solenoid Valve Operation

Types of Solenoid Valve Operation

Every day there seems to be a new type of solenoid valve, some have been developed to cope with new types of media, some employ advances in material sciences to reduce physical size or increased performance, others reliant on new more cost effective production techniques. One of the biggest factors driving the development of solenoid valves is the automation industry where most are deployed. Advances in control technology are placing ever increasing demands on solenoid valve performance. Below are some of the factors that expand the range of types of solenoid valve available today.

Assisted Lift

Assisted lift - the armature driven by the solenoid magnet or coil is attached to an assisted lift solenoid valve diaphragm which in turn controls the opening or closing function of the valve by either lifting the diaphragm or piston away from or pushing against the sealing orifice within the solenoid valve to allow or prevent the flow of liquid of gas media. Typically the solenoid control valve piston or diaphragm will have a servo or pilot circuit within them to allow for pressure assistance for higher pressure applications. Other terminology includes hung diaphragm, forced pilot, kick pilot valve or zero rated valve.

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Direct Acting

Direct acting - the armature driven by the solenoid electromagnet or electric solenoid coil is directly controlling the opening or closing function of the valve by exposing or covering an internal orifice within the solenoid actuated valve to allow or prevent the flow of liquid or gas media. Hence the valve is called a direct acting valve or zero rated valve.

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Pilot / Servo Assisted

Pilot or servo assisted - the armature driven by the solenoid magnet or coil controls an internal pilot circuit which in Pilot servo assist solenoid valve allows the pressure differential to lift open or close the main sealing diaphragm or piston. The principle is based on a small pilot hole on one side of the main piston or diaphragm and the larger pilot hole controlled by the armature. When the solenoid control valve armature lifts and opens the larger pilot hole the pressure is released down stream faster than it can be replenished through the smaller pilot, thus the pressure under the main seal overcomes the pressure above forcing the main seal or piston to lift to allow full flow. Other terminology includes floating diaphragm valve, floating piston valve or pressure assisted valve.

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